ADDANAC CITY comics and news

March 28, 2009

ADDANAC CITY News~ Do You Like To Draw?

Filed under: webcomic — George @ 9:06 pm
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See? Drawing pictures of Hank enables you to pull all the chicks.

See? Drawing pictures of Hank enables you to pull all the chicks.

I’ve mentioned this before, but I thought it was time to blog about it again.

My webcomic ADDANAC CITY has been increasing in popularity lately. A few loyal fans, not to mention pretty decent artists, have sent me their own renditions of Hank, AC’s flagship character.

Response has been strong enough for me to establish a Fan Art Page on the website. So far, I have received drawings of various styles from people throughout the United States. Each picture looks different, but that’s what makes them unique. I love to see other artists’ interpretation of Hank Addanac.

I want to see your drawings of the ADDNAC CITY characters. You will have a chance to get your artwork posted on a comic strip website.

All you have to do is:

~Draw a picture of something Addanac City-related. You can draw Hank or any of the characters from the AC comic strip series. It can be in black-and-white or color. Do your own version of the characters in YOUR style. NO tracing or drawing a panel exactly as I have already done. I’m lookin’ to see YOUR style. I see mine too much every day. 🙂

~send the finished file in the form of a .jpg, .bmp, or .gif
Files should be no larger than 600 kilobytes (the smaller, the better. I’m workin’ wit’ a 56k modem, people).

~send your art file to addanaccity@gmail.com
Use FAN ART in the subject line.

AC 160

I will pick my favorite entries and post them in a special section on the ADDANAC CITY website. I will be adding more artwork as I receive and approve them, so be sure to keep checking the site to see if yours (or your friend’s) has been selected.

Addanac City FAN ART is open to all ages. You aren’t being judged, so don’t worry about if you think you can’t draw as well as Joe Blow up the street. If I think it’s cool, it’s goin’ up on the site.

If I pick your art, I’ll give you credit underneath your picture with your name (or first name and last initial if you crave anonymity), so be sure to tell me your name in your email entry. And the way you spell it is the way I’m gonna spell it, so be careful. Also, include your age so you can inspire your peers.

And to all you folks out there who create webcomics, feel free to throw something my way, too. I’d love to see your rendition of Hank and the gang. If I pick yours, I’ll be sure to throw you a link to your website underneath it. So, let me know what that is in your entry, too.

Well, I think that’s all. Oh, yeah! The place to be to read some of the funniest comic strips out there seven days a week is at Addanac City.
If you have any questions, just hit me back here or at the email address supplied above.

Thanks, and I look forward to seeing your creations!

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March 15, 2009

When I’m not drawing ADDANAC CITY…pt. 2

Filed under: Paintings — George @ 10:51 pm
Tags: , , , , , , ,

george-fords-serving-tray-2I get commisioned every now and then to work on other artistic pieces. A gentleman from the South Boston Museum of Fine Arts contacted me with a request that I contribute something for the annual Tobacco Festival. They wanted to get several artists in my community to paint/decorate these wooden serving trays. The only stipulation was that the trays had to be designed with something that would commemorate the town’s tobacco heritage.

I put aside my ADDANAC CITY comic strip for a few hours and created this piece. I wanted to design something original that still existed within the confines of the theme. I knew that there were, at least, twenty other artists doing the same thing, so I knew that I had some pretty healthy competition. I opted to commemorate tobacco heritage by visually telling the story of how tobacco history is passed down from one generation to the next. I imagined an older gentleman (perhaps a grandfather) showing a tobacco leaf to his young granddaughter. I chose acrylics in which to paint my scene (no fuss, no muss). Below is an enlargement of the design. Yeah, yeah…I know…the girl looks like “Wendy”. I didn’t intend for her to resemble the fast-food icon, but maybe my subconscious was hungry or something.

serving-tray-complete-by-george-ford

My serving tray was auctioned off at the Tobacco Ball that they held in September of ’08. It fetched a relatively hefty bid, as did the other artists’ contributions. I enjoyed working on it, and I’m glad I took pics before it got out of my hands. What do you think of it?

March 13, 2009

When I’m not drawing ADDANAC CITY…

Filed under: Idle thoughts — George @ 11:39 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

Most of you on the web know me best as “that guy who draws the ADDANAC CITY comic strip series“. Although I totally love Hank and his pre-adolescent gang of dysfunctional misfits, I’m an artist at heart and there are other things that I do in the visual realm.

A few years ago, I became involved with my local theater group, Halifax County Little Theatre. These nice people gave me an opportunity to act for the first time (I’ll have to blog about that on another occasion). I played Walter Lee Younger in Lorraine Hansberry’s “A Raisin In The Sun”. Anyway, being that I am a well-rounded artist, I enjoyed my time as a thespian (no, I don’t have a lisp). Also, being that I am a controlling megalomaniac, I had to design the playbill, too.

I began a wonderful relationship with the directors and producers of these plays and they started requesting my artistic skills to promote their performances. One recent project that I worked on was designing something eye-catching for “Escanaba In Da Moonlight”. This was a play originally written, produced, and directed by Jeff Daniels (yeah, that Jeff Daniels). “Escanaba” is a play about a man and his three sons who journey to their camp for the opening day of hunting season in the Upper Penninsula of Michigan. Strange things happen during their excursion. I came up with a pretty nifty design that they loved. This is it.

Photobucket

I stopped by the rehearsals with my trusty digital camera and took photographs of all the actors in the production. I wanted to create something that was true to HCLT’s unique performances, so I made each character resemble the respective actor. I think I did a competent job. Most of the organization’s play posters are printed in black and white, so I had sorta limited creative freedom. It was different without having all of the magnificent, vibrant colors that I get to play with while creating my ADDANAC CITY comics.

How do you think I did with this piece? Be gentle…I bruise easily. 🙂

March 6, 2009

ADDANAC CITY News~ Guest-Strips pt. 2

I created a guest-strip a few weeks ago for another cartoonist friend of mine, Matt Stout of Big Sandy Gilmore. BSG is an hilarious series that features some of the funniest animal characters to come along in a while. I was glad to be able to help Matt out during crunch time.

Here’s my guest-strip.

You can catch Big Sandy Gilmore every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, I believe. Tell Matt I said “hi”.

Another webcomic series that I’ve been reading for a few months comes from a guy who started on the internet around the same time as I. Tommy Pritchard’s comic Relative Truths features a family who lives together, loves together, and sometimes gets on each other’s nerves. Sounds like a real family, huh?

Tommy needed a break to devote more time to his lovely wife and children, so I pitched in for an inning. This is my Relative Truths guest-strip. Check out Tommy’s comic series every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

I would like to say “thank you” again to all of the wonderful webcomic people who have allowed me to crossover my characters with theirs and make an attempt to continue the fun and zaniness that drew me to this medium in the first place. My hat’s off to you!

Addanac-City-Comics
Addanac-City-Comics Graphics and more!
Click here for more Addanac-City-Comics Graphics!

March 5, 2009

ADDANAC CITY News~ Guest-Strips

When I was a kid, I absolutely loooved comic strips and comic books. Being an only child, I could never get enough of them. I cared immensely for those iconic characters that graced those sweet-smelling pages of newsprint. I didn’t know who the artists were and I couldn’t have cared less at the time. I just wanted my comic fix.

As I got older and started developing my love of art, I began to take notice of the varying cartoonists in the field. I had my favorites in the different formats: Steve Ditko, John Romita, Jr., Ron Frenz, Charles Schulz, Mort Walker, Dik Browne (now, that’s a moniker), and many others.

These artists, with all of their various styles, helped make these characters come alive for me. They created a world where I could escape and enjoy a few hours of relaxation. They didn’t draw alike. They had their own unique vision and style. I once heard that, when it comes to art, the definition of style is: “The mistakes that an artist makes”. I think that’s true. If everyone drew perfectly, all art would look alike, wouldn’t it? It’s our slight errors that make our artwork our own. I don’t draw like anyone else, and they don’t draw like me. However, I can appreciate all styles of art.

One thing I have always loved about comics is The Crossover. I enjoyed watching characters from other companies and universes teaming up or duking it out. A few years ago, Image Comics had a switcheroo month where the creative of teams of certain books took over other titles under the company banner. It was so captivating for me to see Erik Larsen tackle Spawn, or to see Jim Lee penciling Savage Dragon. I love the original creators’ styles on their own respective books, but it was like a trip to another planet being able to see them draw other characters. That’s one thing I adore about making webcomics.

We web-cartoonists get to traipse around in each other’s playground sometimes. There are many reasons why there are guest-strips. Sometimes a webcomic’s creator needs to take a sabbatical. Updating can grow daunting, and a creator sometimes needs room to breathe, reassess, and come back fresh. Sometimes, %$# happens: illness, job duties, family necessities, etc. Oftentimes, if a comic isn’t seeing regular updates, the readers will move along to something else, thus resulting in a drastic drop in viewership. No cartoonist wants to build up a loyal audience just to lose them altogether due to “life” occurring.
That’s why it’s good that we can hit up our peers/friends and get a guest-strip from ’em. These gracious guys are saving our necks and giving us an opportunity to supply our readers with fresh product.

I haven’t hit the point (yet, knock on wood) where life has thrown me a curve ball, and I can’t get my comic updated, but I do have a good relationship with some amazing web-cartoonists. One guy in particular, Bearman, sent me a guest-strip the other evening featuring my Addanac City characters, Hank and Christie. I enjoyed seeing him “playing with my toys”. I draw Hank and the gang all the time, so it’s fascinating to see how other cartoonists view them. This is Bearman’s Addanac City comic:

Bearmans Hank Guest-Strip

Bearman creates an hilarious and thought-provoking editorial cartoon blog at Bearman Cartoons. Check out the rest of his amazing, poignant stuff. Thanks for the strip, Bearman! I’ll have to do something nice for you real soon.

I’ve created a number of guest-strips for other cartoonists also. I contributed an unsolicited strip for Mike Freed’s Unemployed Dad comic. Michael’s innovative take on the trials, tribulations, and even celebration of unemployed life is refreshing and original, especially with today’s turbulent times. Every now and then we need to be able to laugh before we pick up the pieces. Read my Unemployed Dad meets Addanac City guest-strip and check out the rest of what Michael does with his amusing creation.

In December, I contributed to The Guest Strip Project. That project was intended to gather a lot of web-cartoonists together to create a storyline for these pre-existing characters from a police force. For each installment, one cartoonist would pick up where the last one left off. That meant that the story could meander anywhere. No need to worry about quality in story and art, though, because these guys gave it their all. Each cartoonist was credited with a link to their own sites plus a chance to help the Make-A-Wish foundation which is a worthy cause in my opinion.

This was my contribution:

Hank Guest Strip Project

Be sure to go thru the archives of the Guest Strip Project to read the entire story.

I have a few other guest-strips finshed and a couple more to complete. I’ll let you all know when they come out. If any of you cartoonists out there want to take on Hank and/or the other characters in Addanac City, just drop me a line and let me know. My door is always open (I gotta get that thing fixed). 🙂

March 1, 2009

ADDANAC CITY~ Getting Reviewed

Filed under: Idle thoughts — George @ 2:54 am
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For most webcomickers, getting reviewed is exciting. Somebody outside of your little, insulated world has taken notice of your humble creation and has decided to broadcast their opinion of it throughout all of the internet world! You are so filled with glee that you can barely contain yourself.

That is, if you’re getting a favorable review.

I’ve been creating ADDANAC CITY off and on, in one form or another, since 1992. The strip started in my local paper, then expanded to a comic book line that lasted for seven issues and sparked a line of t-shirts and other product tie-ins. However, ADDANAC CITY has only been on the internet since August 2008.

When I first began AC it was strictly a regional sensation. My readership extended from Virginia(my home state) to North Carolina and Maryland. I had a few readers from places like New York and Florida, but that was only because someone from VA informed them of ADDANAC CITY’s existence and sent them a copy or so of the comic books (most likely an autographed edition. I try to stay accessible to my faithful readers. I’m not a snobbish celebrity. Yet.) 🙂

Anyway, I yearned to expand the lil’ world of ADDANAC CITY and share it with the rest of the world. The interent seemed like the perfect avenue to do so. The sad part is, I’m not that internet-savvy. I don’t know html from a .php. All I know how to do is make cute little drawings and place them where I want them to be. I don’t have an art staff nor someone to erase my many pencil lines (yes, I still draw on paper. Remember paper?). I also do not have a web-support staff. Everything you see on my official ADDANAC CITY website has been laid out by yours truly. I know my archive section is somewhat difficult to navigate, but it can be done. That’s the only way I know how to do it at this stage. Rest assured, I’ll find a way to make my lil’ slice of web-heaven resemble everyone else’s but, for now, it is what it is. I hope that all of you who check out Hank and his gang of misfits don’t hold it against me too badly. I will improve it one day when I devise a suitable solution.

Now back to getting reviewed….

Since I’ve only been doing this internet thing for about six months, I was so hyped to hear that I was getting reviewed. Now somebody will spread the word that Addanac City is da bomb!!!! Yay!!!

I’ve gotten a couple of positive reviews (some more positive than others). Delos from Art Patient.com reviewed AC in November and had some constructive criticism for me. Overall, I think he appreciated what I was trying to achieve. To read his review of Addanac City, click here

Another review AC received came from Web Comic Herald. You can read what he had to say here

My most recent review came from Julie at Online Comics. The review was short, but I was pleased to be noticed. Catch Julie’s review here

Everything seemed to be going lovely for this cartoonist. I was finally getting recognized for my endeavors. I was on a roll here, folks. Yeah, I had to email most of these reviewers to even make them aware of Addanac City’s existence, but drawing the strip is only half the battle. Garnering reader support is the hardest part. Webcomic artists can easily spend more time promoting their comics than actually creating them. The key is not to let your creativity suffer in pursuit of readership. You can advertise all you want, but if what you’re pushin’ is crap, then you’re still floating up that infamous fecal creek. I really try to balance good comics with good promotion.

So, lest I really digress, I contacted one reviewer to give her a heads-up about my comic. Admittedly, I had forgotten that I had already written her and proceeded to send her another email that was practically identical to the previous one. Her response was that AC would be slated to get reviewed on her next upcoming posting. My heart was fluttering with excitement! “I’m gonna get another fan!” I screamed inside of my head. Yippee!

At least, that’s what I thought. When I clicked on her review, this is what I read
Check it out, then come back here.

Needless to say, I was flabbergasted like my gast has never been flabbered before….

I paced my tiny drawing area, spouting terms that would have career sailors looking for a book of colorful expletives. After an hour (or so), I calmed down and tried to analyze the review diplomatically. Then I started cussin’ again.

The next day, I wrote the reviewer back (I didn’t flame. There’s no need for that. I requested what I got.) I simply thanked her for taking time out of her hectic schedule to give ADDANAC CITY a looksee. The day after THAT, I realized what she was basically trying to say and I went back to my site and began to make changes that would benefit me in the long run. If she felt the way she did, then perhaps others felt the same. I don’t want to alienate my readers nor distress them. So…I made a few changes. I haven’t heard whether people like them or not, but I kinda do. I hope the site looks better now.

Reviews are a two-edged sword. They’re magnificent when they’re positive, but they hurt like heck when they’re not. That’s par for the course, though, people. No matter what you do or how many hours you invest in crafting something, there’s always a chance(no matter how slight) that somebody somewhere will not like it. That shouldn’t cause you to give up. Criticism is necessary. Nothing is perfect no matter how much we wish it to be so. All we can do is listen to the opinion of others and take it for what is: an opinion. I don’t like every album or movie that comes out, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t good. Somebody may like it. Hopefully, my opinion won’t turn them against it.

With that being said, I hope to get more reviews for my ADDANAC CITY comic. Reviews can make potential readers discover AC when they may otherwise not have done so. I want to share my creation with everyone. Some of you will hate it, and some of you will be indifferent to it. But, some of you will absolutely love it! And those are the folks whom I toil day in and day out, jotting down ideas and inking narrow lines, and learning html. I do it because I love ADDANAC CITY. I’m not getting rich off this. I’m doing it for the “love of the game”. I hope you’ll continue to ride along with me.
Whew! I’m glad I got all of this off my chest! Thanks for letting me share. My name is George, and I’m an alcoholic a cartoonist.

And for your patient reading, here’s a free ADDANAC CITY comic strip for ya. Enjoy!

AC 97

February 10, 2009

ADDANAC CITY Gets Reviewed By Web Comic Herald

Every dude, bloke, or lass gets a personal satisfaction out of working on their comic strip series. A lot of time is spent creating something that usually only takes the reader a few seconds to digest, but we enjoy the process. Most of us would do it for free (and a lot of us do). I love to write, pencil, ink, scan, color, and post Addanac City each night. If a strip brings a smile to my face, I’m satisfied. Sometimes it feels like I’m the only one reading the series because crafting a webcomic is a solitary process. I don’t have assistants or editors. I do what I wanna, when I wanna, and how I wanna. I sorta forget that there are others out there who read ADDANAC CITY almost as much as I do.

So, anyway, I was pleasantly surprised to discover that AC received a review from the one and only Web Comic Herald. Every now and then I like to Google myself. I recommend doing that to everyone, but be careful, you’ll get hairy palms. Nonetheless, my results showed that I had garnered a review. This is an excerpt of what it said:

Today’s webcomic is Addanac City, a daily comic strip by George Ford. Addanac City follows the everyday adventures of Hank Addanac, a seven-year-old boy with a bit of a behavioral problem. Of course, when I say “a bit”, I mean it in the same sense that Ebola Zaire is “a bit” deadly. If we knew him in real life, even the most hardened adult would find themselves at wit’s end, but since we don’t have to directly deal with that it’s comedy gold just waiting to happen.

To read the rest of the review, click here.

I’m really glad to know that there are people out there who enjoy my particular brand of humor. I’m not creating an epic story here. I’m just a guy who has a fondness towards old-school newspaper strips with a slight twist. If you’re an avid AC reader, let me know. It gets kinda lonely being chained here to the drawing board.

Now, back to work….. 🙂

Oh, and for those who don’t like ADDANAC CITY…

Addanac-City-Comics
Addanac-City-Comics Graphics and more!
Click here for more Addanac-City-Comics Graphics!
🙂

January 23, 2009

Get your artwork posted on AddanacCity.com!!

Filed under: Uncategorized — George @ 12:41 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,

If you (or someone you know) likes to draw, then this for you!

I will be posting Fan Art on the official ADDANAC CITY website soon and I need some artwork from all of you faithful Addanac Aficionados. This is your chance to get your artwork posted on a major comic strip website!

http://www.addanaccity.com

All you have to do is this:

~Draw a picture of something Addanac City-related. You can draw Hank or any of the characters from the AC comic strip series. It can be in black-and-white or color. Do your own version of the characters in YOUR style. NO tracing or drawing a panel exactly as I have already done. I’m lookin’ to see YOUR style. I see mine too much every day. 🙂

~send the finished file in the form of a .jpg, .bmp, or .gif
Files should be no larger than 600 kilobytes (the smaller, the better. I’m workin’ wit’ a 56k modem, people).

~send your art file to addanaccity@gmail.com
Use FAN ART in the subject line.

I will pick my favorite entries and post them in a special section on the ADDANAC CITY website. I will be adding more artwork as I receive and approve them, so be sure to keep checking the site to see if yours (or your friend’s) has been selected.

Addanac City FAN ART is open to all ages. You aren’t being judged, so don’t worry about if you think you can’t draw as well as Joe Blow up the street. If I think it’s cool, it’s goin’ up on the site.

If I pick your art, I’ll give you credit underneath your picture with your name (or first name and last initial if you crave anonymity), so be sure to tell me your name in your email entry. And the way you spell it is the way I’m gonna spell it, so be careful. Also, include your age so you can inspire your peers.

And to all you folks out there who create webcomics, feel free to throw something my way, too. I’d love to see your rendition of Hank and the gang. If I pick yours, I’ll be sure to throw you a link to your website underneath it. So, let me know what that is in your entry, too.

Well, I think that’s all. Oh, yeah! The place to be to read some of the funniest comic strips out there Monday thru Friday is http://www.addanaccity.com
If you have any questions, just hit me back at the email address provided way above.

Thanks,

George Ford
Creator of ADDANAC CITY

REPOST this bulletin, if you would, so other artists you know can participate!

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